A green death: Is human composting or natural burial for you?

A green death: Is human composting or natural burial for you?

We’re all destined to take a so-called “dirt nap” one day, but more people are planning a green death with burials that will actually return their bod

Canada’s threat level stays at medium following death of ISIS leader al-Baghdadi
300 million people currently live in areas threatened by rising sea levels, study finds
Climate change in Africa may mean more Canadian military help is needed: analysis

We’re all destined to take a so-called “dirt nap” one day, but more people are planning a green death with burials that will actually return their bodies to the dirt — or turn them into fertilizer — after they die.Story continues below

Washington state just legalized a process that turns bodies into human compost in a move that could inspire lawmakers elsewhere to do the same. Some cemeteries are also starting to partition land for green burials, where unpreserved bodies can be interred to naturally decompose. These techniques are often cheaper and more eco-friendly than a traditional coffin burial, and potentially more nourishing for plants than cremated ashes.READ MORE: The need for funerals connects us allAdvocates say green burial options are going to be sorely needed in the years ahead as the baby boomer generation dies out and cemetery space shrinks due to climate change.“As a society, we’re going to have to become much more death literate in the next five to 10 years,” said Erik Lees, former president of the Green Burial Society of Canada.WATCH: Service turns cremated ashes into diamonds

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0