ANDREW PIERCE: Jeremy Corbyn is an unconvincing eco-warrior

ANDREW PIERCE: Jeremy Corbyn is an unconvincing eco-warrior

When Extinction Rebellion laid siege to London over Easter, Jeremy Corbyn eagerly — and some might say cynically — wrapped himself in the eco-proteste

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When Extinction Rebellion laid siege to London over Easter, Jeremy Corbyn eagerly — and some might say cynically — wrapped himself in the eco-protesters’ colours.

With his fudged position on a second EU referendum costing him the support of many younger voters, he then used a Labour Opposition Day debate in the Commons last week to declare a ‘climate emergency’.

As leader of the Opposition since September 2015, you might think Comrade Corbyn had been banging on about green issues for years. 

Jeremy Corbyn used a Labour Opposition Day debate in the Commons last week to declare a ‘climate emergency’. As leader of the Opposition since September 2015, you might think Comrade Corbyn had been banging on about green issues for years

Jeremy Corbyn used a Labour Opposition Day debate in the Commons last week to declare a ‘climate emergency’. As leader of the Opposition since September 2015, you might think Comrade Corbyn had been banging on about green issues for years

Jeremy Corbyn used a Labour Opposition Day debate in the Commons last week to declare a ‘climate emergency’. As leader of the Opposition since September 2015, you might think Comrade Corbyn had been banging on about green issues for years

In fact, the reverse is the case as Environment Secretary Michael Gove brutally observed during the debate.

‘One thing I want to emphasise is that actions and a higher level of ambitions count, but when people across this House say that this situation is an emergency, we need to look at the record,’ Gove said.

‘Since I became Environment Secretary nearly two years ago, the Leader of the Opposition has not used a single Opposition Day to debate climate change or the environment until today.

‘He has not asked a single question — not one — of the Prime Minister about climate change or the environment, despite more than 400 opportunities to do so.

When Extinction Rebellion laid siege to London over Easter, Jeremy Corbyn eagerly — and some might say cynically — wrapped himself in the eco-protesters’ colours. Protesters from Extinction Rebellion are pictured outside Parliament last week

When Extinction Rebellion laid siege to London over Easter, Jeremy Corbyn eagerly — and some might say cynically — wrapped himself in the eco-protesters’ colours. Protesters from Extinction Rebellion are pictured outside Parliament last week

When Extinction Rebellion laid siege to London over Easter, Jeremy Corbyn eagerly — and some might say cynically — wrapped himself in the eco-protesters’ colours. Protesters from Extinction Rebellion are pictured outside Parliament last week

Environment Secretary Michael Gove (above) said: ‘One thing I want to emphasise is that actions and a higher level of ambitions count, but when people across this House say that this situation is an emergency, we need to look at the record' [File photo]

Environment Secretary Michael Gove (above) said: ‘One thing I want to emphasise is that actions and a higher level of ambitions count, but when people across this House say that this situation is an emergency, we need to look at the record' [File photo]

Environment Secretary Michael Gove (above) said: ‘One thing I want to emphasise is that actions and a higher level of ambitions count, but when people across this House say that this situation is an emergency, we need to look at the record’ [File photo]

‘When climate change protesters went to his own home, literally, to bring home the scale of the challenge that we face, he was not able to stop and talk to them . . .’

Rounding on Corbyn for trying to score party political points, he added: ‘We should not try to say that any one party in this House has a monopoly of virtue.’

He might have added that one party leader does seem to have a monopoly on jumping on political bandwagons.

Mrs T’s iron discipline

Lord Tebbit, one of Mrs Thatcher’s most loyal and effective ministers, recalling the 40th anniversary of her first general election victory in May 1979, said: ‘I always think back to a particularly contentious Cabinet discussion. 

She looked round the table and said: “Gentlemen — they all were [men] then — shall we have the facts first and the discussion afterwards?” ’

Arise, Lord Baldrick? Former Blackadder star Sir Tony Robinson, who quit Labour last week after 45 years — he despairs of Comrade Corbyn’s leadership — isn’t short of suitors. 

‘Join us @Tony_Robinson. A warm welcome awaits!’ tweeted the Liberal Democrat group in the Lords. 

Quote of the week: Sir Ed Davey, a former Lib Dem Cabinet minister, says of Labour’s position on the Brexit referendum — ‘Misleading the many, not the few.’

Housing minister Kit Malthouse will never live down the Malthouse Compromise, the briefly fashionable Brexit breakthrough he devised but which was ignored by Theresa May.

‘What a wonderful thing to have on your gravestone,’ BBC presenter Adrian Chiles caustically told the MP.

‘It might be a GCSE Question one day,’ countered Malthouse, optimistically.

Sajid’s ‘Huawei’ with words 

The row over Huawei surfaced at a private meeting of the 1922 Committee of backbench Tory MPs which was grilling Home Secretary Sajid Javid (above) last week [File photo]

The row over Huawei surfaced at a private meeting of the 1922 Committee of backbench Tory MPs which was grilling Home Secretary Sajid Javid (above) last week [File photo]

The row over Huawei surfaced at a private meeting of the 1922 Committee of backbench Tory MPs which was grilling Home Secretary Sajid Javid (above) last week [File photo]

The row over Huawei surfaced at a private meeting of the 1922 Committee of backbench Tory MPs which was grilling Home Secretary Sajid Javid last week.

Ed Vaizey, one of the first to speak, said: ‘As a former Minister for Culture and the Digital Economy, I have been invited to a party by a company called Huawei. Do you recommend that I accept the invitation or not?’

Javid retorted: ‘Ed, when you were the Minister, I was your boss, and I remember you completely ignoring whatever advice that I gave you. So I’m not going to waste my time answering that question.’

Cue loud banging of the desks.  

Contrary to what he said to the BBC’s Andrew Marr yesterday, Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell did forecast big gains for Labour on the eve of the local elections. 

‘I expect Labour to make around 400 gains,’ he had said.

In the event, the Party lost 82 council seats. Let’s hope he’s better with his forecasts if, God forbid, he ever becomes Chancellor of the Exchequer.

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