Black Friday shopping: U.S. products you probably shouldn’t bring back to Canada

Black Friday shopping: U.S. products you probably shouldn’t bring back to Canada

Canadians planning on crossing the border this weekend for Black Friday deals should be careful not to buy certain products.READ MORE: Four scams to w

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Canadians planning on crossing the border this weekend for Black Friday deals should be careful not to buy certain products.READ MORE: Four scams to watch out for while holiday shopping onlineThe Canadian government is warning that while some products may be allowed in the U.S., they don’t meet safety regulations north of the border. Trying to enter back into Canada with them in your car could cause delays and other problems.Here are some products flagged by the government that Canadians probably shouldn’t buy down south.

Getty Images

Getty Images
Story continues belowProhibited productsThere are several products that are legal in the U.S, but aren’t in Canada. If consumers are seen entering into Canada with them, border agents can confiscate them.Some common products — and often unsuspecting ones — flagged by the government include:Baby walkers: Baby walkers were banned in Canada in 2004 amid reports of injuries.Balloon blowing kits: These kits have been banned in Canada since 1973, because it exposes children to inhaling the chemical vapours.Infant self-feeding devices: These devices hold bottles so infants can drink unattended, however the government says they pose a choking hazard.Jequirity beans: These orange or red beans are used to make jewellery, art or instruments, but they can contain toxic materials.WATCH: Two ways to get a bang for your buck this Black Friday if you buy from the U.S.

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