Deaths and injuries on unlit motorways have almost DOUBLED since Government’s energy-saving scheme

Deaths and injuries on unlit motorways have almost DOUBLED since Government’s energy-saving scheme

The number of people killed or seriously injured on unlit motorways has almost doubled since some lights were turned off in 2010, a report has found.

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The number of people killed or seriously injured on unlit motorways has almost doubled since some lights were turned off in 2010, a report has found.

The rise – which comes amid an overall drop in fatalities on motorways and A-roads – was said by critics to be the result of an energy-saving drive.

The AA said lighting was crucial to cutting the number of deaths on roads with a 70mph limit.

People killed or seriously injured on unlit motorways has almost doubled since some lights were turned off in 2010 (stock)

People killed or seriously injured on unlit motorways has almost doubled since some lights were turned off in 2010 (stock)

People killed or seriously injured on unlit motorways has almost doubled since some lights were turned off in 2010 (stock)

On roads where street lights were not being used there was an 88.2 per cent rise in casualties from 93 in 2010 to 175 in 2017 (stock)

On roads where street lights were not being used there was an 88.2 per cent rise in casualties from 93 in 2010 to 175 in 2017 (stock)

On roads where street lights were not being used there was an 88.2 per cent rise in casualties from 93 in 2010 to 175 in 2017 (stock)

The motoring group’s president Edmund King called for a ‘full investigation into the real consequences of turning lights off’, The Times reported.

Latest figures from Highways England showed there were 1,977 casualties on roads that were ‘lit during darkness’ in 2017, a drop of 18.4 per cent on 2010.

But on roads where street lights were not being used there was an 88.2 per cent rise in casualties from 93 to 175.

Around 35 miles of England’s motorways and A-roads had lights switched off in a carbon reduction scheme, including sections of the M2, M5 and M6.

Highways England denied the switch-off had made roads more dangerous, saying it had a ‘greater understanding of where night-time collisions occur’ and could target lighting at these spots.

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