Schoolboy’s condition means he’s in danger of suffering a stroke every time he gets excited or tired

Schoolboy’s condition means he’s in danger of suffering a stroke every time he gets excited or tired

A schoolboy suffering from an extremely rare and incurable condition is in danger of a having a mini stroke every time he is excited or tired.&nb

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A schoolboy suffering from an extremely rare and incurable condition is in danger of a having a mini stroke every time he is excited or tired.  

Corey Adey, eight, of Houghton-Le-Spring, County Durham, was diagnosed with MoyaMoya disease, an extremely rare blood vessel disorder which affects his brain, last year. 

Every day is a constant battle for his mother Jade Snowdon Abbott, 29, who has to prevent her son from doing the things he loves in order to keep him safe. 

Corey was first rushed to hospital after he lost the ability to speak while having a bath. Medics told Ms Snowdon Abbott he had suffered a stroke and multiple mini-strokes.  

A schoolboy suffering from an extremely rare and incurable condition is in danger of a having a mini stroke every time he is excited or tired

A schoolboy suffering from an extremely rare and incurable condition is in danger of a having a mini stroke every time he is excited or tired

Corey Adey, eight, of Houghton-Le-Spring, County Durham, was diagnosed with MoyaMoya disease, an extremely rare blood vessel disorder which affects his brain, last year

Corey Adey, eight, of Houghton-Le-Spring, County Durham, was diagnosed with MoyaMoya disease, an extremely rare blood vessel disorder which affects his brain, last year

Corey Adey, eight, of Houghton-Le-Spring, County Durham, was diagnosed with MoyaMoya disease, an extremely rare blood vessel disorder which affects his brain, last year

Ms Snowdon Abbott explained: ‘When he had his first stroke it was terrifying. He was watching television and said he was tired.

‘I ran him a bath but while he was in it he went floppy and started mumbling. My mother had suffered a stroke so I knew the signs. 

‘I’d never heard of the disease. I thought the doctor was joking. Strokes are something that happen to old people, not little boys. Our life changed completely overnight.’ 

In March 2019, Corey had surgery for more than five hours on both sides of his brain at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London. 

Every day is a constant battle for his mother Ms Snowdon Abbott Snowdon Abbott, 29, who has to prevent her son from doing the things he loves in order to keep him safe

Every day is a constant battle for his mother Ms Snowdon Abbott Snowdon Abbott, 29, who has to prevent her son from doing the things he loves in order to keep him safe

Every day is a constant battle for his mother Ms Snowdon Abbott Snowdon Abbott, 29, who has to prevent her son from doing the things he loves in order to keep him safe

Corey was first rushed to hospital after he lost the ability to speak while having a bath

Corey was first rushed to hospital after he lost the ability to speak while having a bath

Medics told Ms Snowdon Abbott he had suffered a stroke and multiple mini-strokes

Medics told Ms Snowdon Abbott he had suffered a stroke and multiple mini-strokes

Corey was first rushed to hospital after he lost the ability to speak while having a bath. Medics told Ms Snowdon Abbott he had suffered a stroke and multiple mini-strokes

It was to increase the blood flow to his brain as disease is a progressive one and means the carotid artery in the skull becomes blocked or narrowed.

Ms Snowdon Abbott said ‘Corey has around five mini strokes a week. Getting too excited can trigger one.

WHAT IS MOYAMOYA SYNDROME? 

The disease is a rare disorder affecting the blood vessels at the base of the brain.

It causes the arteries supplying the brain with blood to narrow, thereby restricting blood flow to the brain.

The condition can cause a mini stroke, also known as a transient ischemic attack (TIA), as well as a stroke.

The disease mainly afflicts children, but adults can also suffer the condition.

A TIA is caused by a temporary disruption in the blood supply to part of the brain.

It results in a lack of oxygen to the brain.

It can trigger symptoms similar to a stroke, such as speech and visual disturbance, numbness or weakness in the face, arms and legs.

However, a TIA does not last as long as a stroke, the effects only last a few minutes or hours, and fully resolve within 24 hours.

Source: Mayo Clinic and NHS Choices

‘We let Corey on his trampoline ten minutes here, ten minutes there. You have to question everything – is he going to be okay? Are we close to a hospital?

‘Going to the park can set him off. We have to tell him not to stroke dogs because he can get hyper. He loves dogs so it’s heartbreaking.’  

Corey managed to stay free of all mini strokes following his operation until he was recognised at the Best of Wearside Awards for the Child of Courage.

The ceremony had just started when Corey’s hand went limp and his speech was slurred as he had a mini-stroke, which lasted more than 20 minutes. 

Remarkably, he recovered in time to hear his name being called out as a Child of Courage winner.

As the audience rose to give a standing ovation, Corey even went up to the stage to collect the trophy himself.

The youngster is on medication to minimise the risk of strokes, and Ms Snowdon Abbott manages the condition as best she can by trying to keep him calm. She says she has received a lot of support from the Stroke Association.

Ms Snowdon Abbott added: ‘I couldn’t be any prouder of Corey. He takes everything in his stride. 

‘He’s such a funny lad who despite everything he has gone through, is a really loving little boy. 

‘It’s very difficult as a mother having to put a limit on how much fun he has, but as a parent I have no choice.

‘I want to get the awareness out there because I didn’t have a clue about the disorder before. I want people to know about it, as another parent could find themselves in my situation.’

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