Scientists try to save rare Rhino population with 1st test tube embryo

Scientists try to save rare Rhino population with 1st test tube embryo

BERLIN — Scientists in Europe said Tuesday they’ve successfully transferred a test tube rhino embryo back into a female whose eggs were fertilized in

Anti-Brexit parties unveil election ‘alliance’ in bid to defeat Boris Johnson
U.S.-backed forces proclaim ‘destruction’ of Islamic State after seizing Syrian village
Russia, Turkey begin joint patrols in northeast Syria

BERLIN — Scientists in Europe said Tuesday they’ve successfully transferred a test tube rhino embryo back into a female whose eggs were fertilized in vitro, as part of an effort to save another nearly extinct sub-species of the giant horned mammal.The procedure was performed last month on a southern white rhino at Chorzow zoo in Poland, said Thomas Hildebrandt of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research in Berlin.Story continues below

Hildebrandt is part of BioRescue, an international team of scientists and conservationists trying to use IVF to save the rare northern white rhino.READ MORE: World’s last male northern white rhino is sick: ‘We do not want him to suffer’Only two northern white rhinos — both females — are left. The last male northern white rhino, named Sudan, died in March 2018. Scientists had preserved frozen sperm samples from several males that they now hope to use to revive the species.Scientists chose to test the IVF transfer on southern white rhinos, a closely related sub-species whose numbers have stabilized in the wild.WATCH: World’s last male northern white rhino dies

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0