Seven-bedroom country home where Edwin Lutyens courted his future wife goes on sale for £4.5million 

Seven-bedroom country home where Edwin Lutyens courted his future wife goes on sale for £4.5million 

A striking country house rebuilt by one of Britain's greatest architects, Edwin Lutyens, is on the market for £4.5million. Grade II listed Warren Mer

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A striking country house rebuilt by one of Britain’s greatest architects, Edwin Lutyens, is on the market for £4.5million.

Grade II listed Warren Mere was one of Lutyens’s first country houses, which he used to court his future wife by taking her on a moonlit bicycle ride to show off his work. 

Lutyens, who designed the Cenotaph on Whitehall, extensively remodelled the house for his friends when he was in his 20s, and has stunning gardens designed by Lutyens’s Arts and Crafts professional partner Gertrude Jekyll. 

Grade II listed Warren Mere, a striking country house rebuilt by one of Britain's greatest architects, Edwin Lutyens, is on the market for £4.5million in Thursley, Surrey

Grade II listed Warren Mere, a striking country house rebuilt by one of Britain's greatest architects, Edwin Lutyens, is on the market for £4.5million in Thursley, Surrey

Grade II listed Warren Mere, a striking country house rebuilt by one of Britain’s greatest architects, Edwin Lutyens, is on the market for £4.5million in Thursley, Surrey

The house, which dates back to the 16th century, was one of Lutyens's first country houses, which he used to court his future wife, Lady Emily Lytton, by taking her on a moonlit bicycle ride to show off his work. Pictured is the drawing room

The house, which dates back to the 16th century, was one of Lutyens's first country houses, which he used to court his future wife, Lady Emily Lytton, by taking her on a moonlit bicycle ride to show off his work. Pictured is the drawing room

The house, which dates back to the 16th century, was one of Lutyens’s first country houses, which he used to court his future wife, Lady Emily Lytton, by taking her on a moonlit bicycle ride to show off his work. Pictured is the drawing room

The seven-bedroom property is located just two miles from the home where Lutyens grew up. While it is one of his lesser-known houses it is still considered a good example of his early work and it especially noteworthy for its connection with Lutyens's love life. Pictured is the indoor swimming pool

The seven-bedroom property is located just two miles from the home where Lutyens grew up. While it is one of his lesser-known houses it is still considered a good example of his early work and it especially noteworthy for its connection with Lutyens's love life. Pictured is the indoor swimming pool

The seven-bedroom property is located just two miles from the home where Lutyens grew up. While it is one of his lesser-known houses it is still considered a good example of his early work and it especially noteworthy for its connection with Lutyens’s love life. Pictured is the indoor swimming pool

While he was working on it in 1896, he persuaded Lady Emily Lytton to go for a moonlight cycle ride to the house to show off his handiwork and they got married the following year.

The seven-bedroom property, which is just two miles from the home where he grew up in Thursley, Surrey, is now up for sale with estate agents Knight Frank.

Warren Mere, originally called Warren Lodge, dates back to the 16th century, but Lutyens extended and remodelled it in an Arts and Crafts style in 1896-7 for his friends Robert and Barbara Webb.

It is one of his least-known houses but considered a fine example of his early work and noteworthy for its connection with the famous architect’s love life.

Warren Mere, originally called Warren Lodge, dates back to the 16th century but Lutyens extended and remodelled it in an Arts and Crafts style in 1896-7 for his friends Robert and Barbara Webb

Warren Mere, originally called Warren Lodge, dates back to the 16th century but Lutyens extended and remodelled it in an Arts and Crafts style in 1896-7 for his friends Robert and Barbara Webb

Warren Mere, originally called Warren Lodge, dates back to the 16th century but Lutyens extended and remodelled it in an Arts and Crafts style in 1896-7 for his friends Robert and Barbara Webb

Lutyens began courting Lady Emily in 1896 and they got married the following year after he took her on a moonlit bicycle ride around Warren Mere. Pictured is the sitting room

Lutyens began courting Lady Emily in 1896 and they got married the following year after he took her on a moonlit bicycle ride around Warren Mere. Pictured is the sitting room

Lutyens began courting Lady Emily in 1896 and they got married the following year after he took her on a moonlit bicycle ride around Warren Mere. Pictured is the sitting room

The pair are thought to have broken into the house, which belonged to friends of Lutyens, and wandered around at night. The house is located on 63 acres of land

The pair are thought to have broken into the house, which belonged to friends of Lutyens, and wandered around at night. The house is located on 63 acres of land

The pair are thought to have broken into the house, which belonged to friends of Lutyens, and wandered around at night. The house is located on 63 acres of land

Warren Mere now boasts a massive 9,695 sq ft of accommodation with a reception hall, drawing room, sitting room, dining room, orangery, kitchen/breakfast room, galleried library and seven bedrooms - all with en suite bathrooms

Warren Mere now boasts a massive 9,695 sq ft of accommodation with a reception hall, drawing room, sitting room, dining room, orangery, kitchen/breakfast room, galleried library and seven bedrooms - all with en suite bathrooms

Warren Mere now boasts a massive 9,695 sq ft of accommodation with a reception hall, drawing room, sitting room, dining room, orangery, kitchen/breakfast room, galleried library and seven bedrooms – all with en suite bathrooms

The couple were staying with the Webbs at Milford in September 1896 when Lutyens took Emily on a moonlight cycle to see the house he was building for their hosts.

They apparently broke in through a window and wandered about the house. 

It must have had an impact as the next day he took Lady Emily to meet Jekyll at Munstead, the house he had built for her that started their professional partnership.

Lutyens and Lady Emily married the following year and spent the first few days of their honeymoon at Warren Lodge at the invitation of the Webbs.

It sits in the middle of 63 acres of land, with the house overlooking one of its three lakes (pictured). The grounds include a tennis court, indoor swimming pool, formal gardens and a mixture of woodland and pasture

It sits in the middle of 63 acres of land, with the house overlooking one of its three lakes (pictured). The grounds include a tennis court, indoor swimming pool, formal gardens and a mixture of woodland and pasture

It sits in the middle of 63 acres of land, with the house overlooking one of its three lakes (pictured). The grounds include a tennis court, indoor swimming pool, formal gardens and a mixture of woodland and pasture

The house, which is being listed with estate agent Knight Frank, was extensively remodelled by Lutyens in 1909 for the then owner Lord Stamfordham.  He added a long guest and service wing. Pictured is the kitchen

The house, which is being listed with estate agent Knight Frank, was extensively remodelled by Lutyens in 1909 for the then owner Lord Stamfordham.  He added a long guest and service wing. Pictured is the kitchen

The house, which is being listed with estate agent Knight Frank, was extensively remodelled by Lutyens in 1909 for the then owner Lord Stamfordham.  He added a long guest and service wing. Pictured is the kitchen

There is also a self-contained one-bedroom flat attached to the main house and a three-bedroom cottage attached to a separate garage block, as well as extensive stables, store rooms, a studio and a greenhouse. Pictured is one of the hallways which leads to a patio terrace

There is also a self-contained one-bedroom flat attached to the main house and a three-bedroom cottage attached to a separate garage block, as well as extensive stables, store rooms, a studio and a greenhouse. Pictured is one of the hallways which leads to a patio terrace

There is also a self-contained one-bedroom flat attached to the main house and a three-bedroom cottage attached to a separate garage block, as well as extensive stables, store rooms, a studio and a greenhouse. Pictured is one of the hallways which leads to a patio terrace

He extended it again in 1909 for the then owner Lord Stamfordham, adding a long guest and service wing.

The house now has a massive 9,695 sq ft of accommodation with a reception hall, drawing room, sitting room, dining room, orangery, kitchen/breakfast room, galleried library and seven bedrooms, all with en suite bathrooms.

There is also a self-contained one-bedroom flat attached to the main house and a three-bedroom cottage attached to a separate garage block, as well as extensive stables, store rooms, a studio and a greenhouse.

It sits in the middle of 63 acres of land, with the house overlooking one of its three lakes. The grounds include a tennis court, indoor swimming pool, formal gardens and a mixture of woodland and pasture.

A spokesman from Knight Frank said: ‘Warren Mere is a substantial house, close to the popular village of Thursley.

‘It was extensively remodelled by Sir Edwin Lutyens, widely regarded as the greatest architect of his age.

‘The house sits perfectly surrounded by its magnificent grounds, first laid down by the celebrated garden designer Gertrude Jekyll.

‘In all, a light and airy Grade II listed residence, perfect for entertaining and with extensive guest and staff accommodation.’ 

A spokesman from Knight Frank said: 'The house sits perfectly surrounded by its magnificent grounds, first laid down by the celebrated garden designer Gertrude Jekyll'. Pictured is the detached three-bedroom cottage and bay garage

A spokesman from Knight Frank said: 'The house sits perfectly surrounded by its magnificent grounds, first laid down by the celebrated garden designer Gertrude Jekyll'. Pictured is the detached three-bedroom cottage and bay garage

A spokesman from Knight Frank said: ‘The house sits perfectly surrounded by its magnificent grounds, first laid down by the celebrated garden designer Gertrude Jekyll’. Pictured is the detached three-bedroom cottage and bay garage

They added: 'The house sits perfectly surrounded by its magnificent grounds, first laid down by the celebrated garden designer Gertrude Jekyll'. Pictured is a reception area in the house

They added: 'The house sits perfectly surrounded by its magnificent grounds, first laid down by the celebrated garden designer Gertrude Jekyll'. Pictured is a reception area in the house

They added: ‘The house sits perfectly surrounded by its magnificent grounds, first laid down by the celebrated garden designer Gertrude Jekyll’. Pictured is a reception area in the house

The floor plan of the first floor of Warren Mere along with the detached three-bedroom cottage which has its own garages

The floor plan of the first floor of Warren Mere along with the detached three-bedroom cottage which has its own garages

The floor plan of the first floor of Warren Mere along with the detached three-bedroom cottage which has its own garages

The floor plan of the ground floor of seven-bedroom Warren Mere as well as the stables, greenhouse and studio

The floor plan of the ground floor of seven-bedroom Warren Mere as well as the stables, greenhouse and studio

The floor plan of the ground floor of seven-bedroom Warren Mere as well as the stables, greenhouse and studio

SIR EDWIN LUTYENS: BRITAIN’S GREATEST EVER ARCHITECT  

Sir Edwin Lutyens, who is often referred to as Britain's greatest ever architect, who remodelled Warren Mere in 1897. He is best known for designing the Cenotaph in central London 

Sir Edwin Lutyens, who is often referred to as Britain's greatest ever architect, who remodelled Warren Mere in 1897. He is best known for designing the Cenotaph in central London 

Sir Edwin Lutyens, who is often referred to as Britain’s greatest ever architect, who remodelled Warren Mere in 1897. He is best known for designing the Cenotaph in central London 

Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens has been referred to as ‘the greatest British architect’.

He designed the Grade I listed Cenotaph that stands in Whitehall, London.

It was erected in 1919 for the Allied Victory Parade and was intended to commemorate the victims of the First World War.

But it is now used to remember all of the dead in all wars in which British servicemen and women have fought.

He is known for having an instrumental role in designing and building a section of the metropolis of Delhi, known as New Delhi.

In collaboration with Sir Herbert Baker, he was also the main architect of several monuments including the India Gate in Delhi.

He also designed Viceroy’s House, which is now known as the Rashtrapati Bhavan.

It is regarded as his most important building and combined aspects of classical architecture with Indian decoration.

In 1924 he completed the supervision of the construction of what is perhaps his most popular design: Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House.

This four-storey Palladian villa was built in 1/12 scale and is now a permanent exhibit in the public area of Windsor Castle.

He married Emily Lytton, daughter of a Viceroy of India, in 1897.

After World War I Lutyens became architect to the Imperial War Graves Commission, for which he designed the Cenotaph, the Great War Stone and military cemeteries in France.

His vast project for the Roman Catholic cathedral at Liverpool was incomplete at his death.

He also designed the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme, which remembers 72,195 British and South African men who died in the Battles of the Somme.

It is the largest British battle memorial in the world and was built between 1928 and 1932. 

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