Should Canada have presumed consent for organ donations? Here are the pros and cons

Should Canada have presumed consent for organ donations? Here are the pros and cons

Nova Scotia could become the first province in Canada to adopt a policy of presumed consent for organ donation.That means unless you say no — or your

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Nova Scotia could become the first province in Canada to adopt a policy of presumed consent for organ donation.That means unless you say no — or your next of kin says no — your organs will be donated if they can be.Children under the age of 19 will be exempt from the law, which is expected to be implemented in 2020.READ MORE: Nova Scotia could be 1st jurisdiction in North America to adopt presumed consent for organ donations
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Some have raised concerns about the practice, saying it could cause more doubt about the donor’s wishes.Currently, around 20 per cent of organ donors do not donate their organs because of the decisions made by next of kin, said James Breckenridge, CEO of the Canadian Transplant Association (CTA).“It doesn’t really mean anything because next of kin still has the final say,” Breckenridge said.He explained that an opt-out program would lead to fewer conversations between the donor and their spouse, family member or loved one with power of attorney.Without a conversation about organ donation, the decision would “put more doubt in their mind as to whether that person wanted to be a donor because now they’ve never even mentioned it,” he explained.WATCH: Here’s why organ donation is so important to consider

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